GENERATIVE CURIOSITY

 

 

 

Generative Curiosity introduces new ideas to the field in a timely, unadulterated fashion with the aim to encourage further scholarly interest, conversation, and collaboration.  It is edited by David Hannah.

Generative Curiosity provides a venue that welcomes and rewards curiosity so that scholars can present ideas that stimulate future scholarly activities in expansive, not reductionist, ways. In keeping with the section’s title, we are particularly interested in ideas that stimulate management scholarship.

 

We invite scholars and practitioners to identify a new or ignored fact, phenomenon, pattern, event, or other issue of interest, and to draw it to the attention of others. In doing so, we hope to stimulate inquiries that (a) improve our understanding of how organizations work and how they can be made more effective (Ashforth, 2005); (b) develop and disseminate knowledge that matters to organizations and society (Alvesson & Sandberg, 2013); and (c) address the human condition (van Aken & Romme, 2009). Ultimately, we wish to generate management inquiries that are not just about “what is,” but also “what can be” (Aguinis & Vandenberg, 2014, p. 581). 

 

Generative Curiosity honors the importance of scholarship, preserving our scholarly vitality, and stimulating a scholarly community. Oliver’s (2010) comments epitomize the kind of scholarship we hope to attract:

"Scholarship . . . is grounded in an imperative to improve the human condition through understanding and through new ways of looking at ourselves and the physical world of which we are a part. Scholarship . . . is creative ambiguity . . . Scholarship is the telling of a previously untold tale. (p. 27)"

You can read Generative Curiosity´s "birth certificate" here.

REFERENCES

Alvesson, M., Sandberg, J. (2013). Has management studies lost its way? Ideas for more imaginative and innovative research. Journal of Management Studies, 50, 128-152. Google Scholar, Crossref, ISI

Ashforth, B. E. (2005). Becoming vanilla pudding: How we undermine our passion for research. Journal of Management Inquiry, 14, 400-403. Google Scholar, SAGE Journals, ISI

Aguinis, H., Vandenberg, R. J. (2014). An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure: Improving research quality before data collection. Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior, 1, 569-595. Google Scholar, Crossref

Aguinis, H., Vandenberg, R. J. (2014). An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure: Improving research quality before data collection. Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior, 1, 569-595. Google Scholar, Crossref

© 2018 by Journal of Management Inquiry

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